Click here to visit LS1Tech
Click here to visit Performance Trucks
Click here to visit Mod Motor Tech
Click here to visit Modern Hemi

PerformanceTrucks.net Forums  

Go Back   PerformanceTrucks.net Forums > GENERAL TRUCK PERFORMANCE, PROJECTS, & GROUP DISCUSSION...specifically > INTERNAL ENGINE MODIFICATIONS
Sign in using an external account
Register Forgot Password?

Welcome to Performance Trucks!
Welcome to Performance Trucks,

You are currently viewing our forum as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community, at no cost, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is free, fast and simple, so please join our community today!


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 05-15-2007, 07:46 AM   #11
Trader Rating: 0
TECH Resident
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: San Antonio
Posts: 878
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Krab
Is there anyway to tell if your truck came with AFM/VVT? The truck in question is an '07 Silverado. Any factory codes that would let me know?

As long as the truck isn't equipped with AFM, I can still perform a camswap on it like any other LSx based engine, right?
All 07 1500 silverado's with 5.3 or 6.0 have AFM.


If you dont care about AFM, you can disable it in the tune and do a cam swap as usual.

The 6.0 has VVT and would probably be more complicated. Look on LS1tech at the L92 info for more info on whats needed to do a cam swap.
__________________
2008 GMC Sierra RCSB
LY2, M30, GT4, G80
sold
nighthawk08 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2007, 07:50 AM   #12
Trader Rating: 0
TECH Resident
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: San Antonio
Posts: 878
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by eallanboggs
AFM(DOD) uses special lifters on the 4 cylinders that get shut off during AFM mode. There are also special lobes on the cam for those cylinders. .
I'm 99% sure there are NOT special lobes for AFM.
__________________
2008 GMC Sierra RCSB
LY2, M30, GT4, G80
sold
nighthawk08 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2007, 08:37 AM   #13
Trader Rating: 5
TECH Enthusiast
 
bad intentions's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Roma/Edinburg TX
Posts: 561
Default

i am pretty sure my truck does not have afm or vvt nor flex fuel for that matter and you can swap cams cause it been done here in valley before they just dont want to share the serect....
__________________
01 silverado 4.8 stock 15.9... Keeping it stock 57 thousand miles...
02 SS camaro 13.6 stock... New mods QTP LTs TSP Y, dynomax bullet and Magnaflow catback. SLP cold pac, Potz TB.
bad intentions is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2007, 08:47 AM   #14
Trader Rating: 1
TECH Addict
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 2,076
Default

There are 2 different 07 Silverados. One is listed as the Classic(leftover). The other is referred to as the NEW Silverado. The Classic is just another way of saying it's really a left over from 06. You can modify the 07 Classic, but not the NEW 07. Certain "NEW" Silverado's have AFM(DOD) and the 6.0Ls have both AFM and VVT. You can NOT disable AFM with a tune of your PCM unless you can disable the solenoids that control the oil flow to the special lifter that AFM uses. Why would you want to do that? Just disabling AFM doesn't give you the ability to install an aftermarket cam so what purpose would disabling AFM serve other than to reduce you gas milage during highway driving. The days of installing an aftermarket cam in a LS series Silverado are OVER. Not because of the cam, but because of the special lifers and solenoids that ride in the lifer valley where the knock sensor used to go. You would have to get rid of the cam. special(expensive) lifters, 4 solenoids and the wiring harness that goes with them. Now you have to buy a new set of lifters(old style) in addition to the cam. Would it work? Probably not because you still have to block off all the oil passages that feed the oil to these special lifters to be able to maintain oil pressure. I haven't heard of anyone who has even tried it let alone successfully made the conversion. I'm sure the AFM has a special block to accomodate the oil passages altho I don't know the block designation. I didn't read anything about it using external oil feed lines for the lifters that you could just remove and block off to enable you to make the conversion you're thinking about. I was going to buy a "NEW" Silverado myself, but when I read more about AFM and VVT I put it off and sold the cam I had in my 04 Silverado. I plan to buy an 08 because I've heard they will offer the 6L80E and T56 Tremec with the 6.0Ls in the 08s. Can you imagine a T56 in a Silverado. I can especially with a 6.0L. I do have a set of StageII Patriot Performce CNCed heads and some Pacesetter Longtubes to put on my new Silverado when I get it home from the dealership along with an ASP underdrive pulley and cold air induction. I know all that stuff doesn't work properly with a stock cam, but if you have a Silverado with AFM you don't have much choice. Sorry!
eallanboggs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2007, 09:09 AM   #15
Trader Rating: 0
TECH Resident
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: San Antonio
Posts: 878
Default

How do you know that you cannot install an aftermarket cam along with AFM? The AFM has special lifters in 4 cylinders, but why would you need to replace them? What is your proof of all these claims?

Yes you can disable AFM in the tune.

All gen IV blocks have provisions for AFM.

'08 information has been released and nothing includes a 6 speed auto or manual for 1500's.

Your providing a lot of unverified information, but if you can back it up with some FACTS, that would be great.
__________________
2008 GMC Sierra RCSB
LY2, M30, GT4, G80
sold
nighthawk08 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2007, 09:13 AM   #16
Trader Rating: 0
TECH Apprentice
 
niugnep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Alberta
Posts: 385
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by colyneedsv8
I'm 99% sure there are NOT special lobes for AFM.
Nope, its true...those 4 cyl cam lobes are slightly different. I will try to find article that mentions it (Hot Rod?) as GM doesn't care cause you would only replace with another stocker.Some light reading right from GM on one engine:

2007 Vortec 5.3L V8 (LMG)

The next-generation Vortec 5.3L V8 is standard in the all-new Avalanche SUT and Suburban and Yukon XL full-size sport-utility vehicles. It is optional in the Tahoe and Yukon full-size sport-utility vehicles and the New Silverado and Sierra pickups . In all applications, the Vortec 5.3L is installed with GM Powertrainís Hydra-Matic 4L60 four-speed automatic transmission.

The Vortec 5.3L has been the most popular Vortec V8 and it offers technology for every truck buyerís needs: Powertrainís industry leading Active Fuel Management technology, cast-iron engine block, and E85 flex-fuel capability are features on the (LMG). These engines are the fourth-generation descendents of one of the most important and successful engines in automotive historyóthe original Chevrolet small-block, which debuted in 1955. The Gen IV Vortecs feature technology the creators of the first small block could not have imagined, yet they share one fundamental trait with the original: a market-leading balance of performance, sophistication, economy and durability.

The first Gen IV Vortec V8 (LH6) was introduced for model year 2005 in GMís mid-size sport-utility vehicles.

SAE Certified Power rating
SAE certification is a voluntary power and torque certification procedure developed by the SAE Engine Test Code committee and approved March 31, 2005 . This procedure (J2723) ensures fair, accurate ratings for horsepower and torque by allowing manufacturers to certify their engines through third-party witness testing to the SAE J1349 standard. Refer to the horsepower / torque plots in this section.


Gen IV Cylinder Block
The Gen IV cylinder block shares two key design elements with GMís original small block V8: a 90-degree cylinder angle with 4.4 inch bore centers. Beyond that, the latest small block applies design, casting and machining technologies that were unfathomable in the 1950s.

The Gen IV block debuted in 2005 as the foundation for the 400-hp LS2 V8 in the Chevrolet Corvette, Cadillac CTS-v and Pontiac GTO. The new Vortec truck block applies all the improvements in the LS2, tailored for the demands of truck application.
It was developed with the latest math-based tools and data acquired in GMís racing programs, and it an exceptionally light, rigid foundation for an impressively smooth engine. Its deep-skirt design helps maximize strength and minimize vibration. The bulkheads accommodate six-bolt, cross-threaded main-bearing caps that limit crank flex and stiffen the engineís structure. A structural oil pan further stiffens the powertrain.

The new-generation small block is cast with oil ports in its V, or valley, to accommodate advanced technologies in the Vortec 5.3L, including Active Fuel Management (AFM) cylinder deactivation. The Lifter Oil Manifold Assembly (LOMA), a key component of AFM, installs in the valley in place of a conventional engine block cover. As a result, knock sensors located in the valley on the Gen III V8 have been moved to the outside of the engine block, while the cam sensor has been moved from the rear of the block to the front cover.

The Vortec 5.3L is offered with either a conventional cast-iron block (LMG), or an aluminum engine block (LC9), giving customers a choice and allowing technology appropriate to the application. The lighter aluminum block allows vehicle engineers more latitude in tailoring weight distribution, and can mean a slight improvement in fuel economy. The Gen IV aluminum block is cast from A356-T6 alloy, with pressed-in iron cylinder liners. It weighs roughly 100 lbs. less than a comparable cast-iron engine block.

Active Fuel Management
All Gen IV Vortec 5.3L V8s feature GMís industry leading Active Fuel Management technology (AFM). AFM temporarily de-actives four of the 5.3Lís cylinders under light load conditions. It increases fuel economy 7 percent under the federal governmentís required testing procedure and potentially more in certain real-world driving conditions. Yet truck owners donít sacrifice superior V8 power and performance to go farther on a tank of gas.

Active Fuel Management stems from a simple premise: most truck owners have more power than they need much of the time. Many choose powerful V8 engines to be prepared for the occasional heavy load, but during routine commuting that powerful engine operates at a fraction of its capability. Volumetric efficiency is impaired, and that means less than optimal fuel mileage. AFM offers a common-sense solution. It saves fuel by using only half of the Vortec 5.3Lís cylinders during some driving conditions, and seamlessly reactivates the other cylinders when a driver demands full power for acceleration or load hauling.

Managed by the new E38 engine control module (ECM), AFM automatically shuts down every second cylinder, according to firing order, during light-load operation. In engineering terms, this allows the working cylinders to achieve better thermal, volumetric and mechanical efficiency by reducing heat loss, combustion loss and friction, and lowering cyclical combustion variation from cylinder to cylinder. As a result, AFM delivers better fuel economy and lower operating costs. Perhaps the most sensible thing about AFM is that it harnesses the engineís existing capabilities, starting with the potential designed into the E38 ECM. The only mechanical components required are special valve lifters for cylinders that are deactivated, and their control system. The incremental cost for the customer is nominal per engine. Active Fuel Management relies on three primary components: De-ac (for deactivation) or collapsible valve lifters, a Lifter Oil Manifold Assembly (LOMA), and the ECM.

One of the most sophisticated engine controllers extant, the E38 ECM (below) measures load conditions based on inputs from vehicle sensors and interprets that information to mange more than 100 engine operations, from fuel injection to spark control to electronic throttle control. AFM adds an algorithm to the engine control software to manage cylinder deactivation and reactivation. When loads are light, the E38 automatically closes both intake and exhaust valves for half of the cylinders and cuts fuel delivery to those four. The valves re-open to activate all cylinders when the driver demands brisk acceleration or full torque to move a load. The engineís electronic throttle control (ETC) is used to balance torque following cylinder deactivation or reactivation. The transition takes less than 20 milliseconds, and canít be detected by the driver.

Valve lifters are operated by the engineís camshaft, and lift a pushrod that operates the valves in the cylinder head. In the Gen IV Vortec 5.3L, the De-ac lifters are installed in cylinders 1, 4, 6 and 7, while the remaining cylinders use conventional lifters. The hydraulically operated De-ac lifters have a spring-loaded locking pin actuated by oil pressure. For deactivation, hydraulic pressure dislodges the locking pin, collapsing the top portion of the lifter into the bottom and removing contact with the pushrod. The bottom of each De-Ac lifter rides up and down on the cam lobe but the top does not move the push rod. The valves do not operate and combustion in that cylinder stops. During reactivation, the oil pressure is removed, and the lifter locks at full length. The pushrods, and therefore the valves, operate normally.

The final AFM component is the LOMA. This cast-aluminum assembly is installed in the Vortec 5.3ís V, or valley, in place of a conventional engine block cover. The LOMA holds four solenoids, control wiring and cast-in oil passages. The solenoids are managed by the ECM, and each one controls oil flow to a De-Ac Lifter, activating and de-activating the valves at one cylinder as required for Active Fuel Management.

The Gen IV Vortec 5.3Lís fuel injectors are identical for all cylinders; those feeding the de-activated cylinders are simply shut down electrically by the ECM during de-activation. When the cylinders are deactivated, the engine effectively operates as a V4. AFM operation is load based, as measured by the ECM using dozens of inputs, overlain with the driverís demand for power as measured by throttle application. AFMís response time varies with oil temperature, but in all cases is measured in milliseconds. Operation is always transparent to the driver. The engine returns to V8 mode the instant the controller determines that acceleration or load requires additional power.

The benefits are substantial. Active Fuel Management does not effect exhaust emissions, and it will reduce overall emissions significantly to the extent that less fuel is used. Further, the savings reflected in EPA numbers may not account for AFMís full impact. Owners who primarily travel long distances at steady speeds will see substantially greater fuel-economy improvements. GM expects 2 million vehicles with Active Fuel Management on the road by 2008.

The exhaust system for the Gen IV Vortec 5.3L required careful tuning to maintain optimal noise and vibration control. In four-cylinder operation, the engine creates second-order exhausts pulses; in eight-cylinder operation, in creates fourth-order exhaust pulses. The system requires special pipe tuning to account for both.
niugnep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2007, 09:19 AM   #17
Trader Rating: 0
TECH Apprentice
 
niugnep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Alberta
Posts: 385
Default

Here is the article, about 8 paragraphs from the end says "has different lobes" although seems to be *some* confusion about that...

http://www.superchevy.com/technical/...s/0405sc_gmdod

Last edited by niugnep; 05-15-2007 at 09:19 AM. Reason: typos
niugnep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2007, 09:19 AM   #18
Trader Rating: 0
TECH Resident
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: San Antonio
Posts: 878
Default

I read that earlier, it doesn't mention the lobes.

Someone has had to have pulled one of these cams....we could find out for sure.
__________________
2008 GMC Sierra RCSB
LY2, M30, GT4, G80
sold
nighthawk08 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2007, 09:20 AM   #19
Trader Rating: 0
TECH Apprentice
 
niugnep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Alberta
Posts: 385
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by colyneedsv8
I read that earlier, it doesn't mention the lobes.
Read the other one, (as I mentioned the GM article didn't say anything about the lobes but why would they, most customers don't care if some lobes are slightly different).
niugnep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2007, 09:24 AM   #20
Trader Rating: 0
TECH Resident
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: San Antonio
Posts: 878
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by niugnep
Read the other one, (as I mentioned the GM article didn't say anything about the lobes but why would they, most customers don't care if some lobes are slightly different).
the article basically says they're not sure either. someone will have to measure a cam.
nighthawk08 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2007, 09:24 AM
PerformanceTrucks
Ford F150




Paid Advertisement
Reply

Tags
2007, 53, active, afm, disable, ecm, fuel, general, ls, management, motors, silverado, silverados, tahoe, turn, vvt


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:56 AM.

 



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

PerformanceTrucks.net and InternetBrands, Inc. are not affiliated with the Ford Motor Company